Unverified Commit 75506f6f authored by fauno's avatar fauno

un poco mas...

parent 90fbc8a0
......@@ -1328,55 +1328,27 @@ diseño original de la _WWW_. De la misma forma, el _gobierno 2.0_ no es
un nuevo tipo de gobierno, sino un gobierno despojado hasta el núcleo,
redescubierto y reimaginado como si fuera la primera vez."
Once it’s been established that new paradigms of government can be
modeled on the success of technology companies, O’Reilly can argue that
“it’s important to think deeply about what the three design principles
of transparency, participation, and collaboration mean in the context of
technology.” These were the very three principles that the Obama
administration articulated in its “Open Government Directive,” published
on the president’s first day in office. But why do we have to think
about their meaning in “the context of technology”? The answer is quite
simple: whatever transparency and participation used to mean doesn’t
matter any longer. Now that we’ve moved to an era of Everything 2.0, the
meaning of those terms will be dictated by the possibilities and
inclinations of technology. And what is technology today if not “open
source” and “Web 2.0”?
Una vez establecido que los nuevos paradigmas del gobierno pueden
Una vez establecido que los nuevos paradigmas del Estado pueden
modelarse a semejanza del éxito de las empresas tecnológicas, O'Reilly
puede argumentar que "es importante pensar profundamente acerca de lo
que los tres principios de diseño que son la transparencia, la
participación y la colaboración significan en el contexto de la
tecnología". Estos eran los mismos tres principios que el gobierno de
Obama articulaba en sus "directivas para el gobierno abierto", publicado
en su primer día como presidente. ¿Pero por qué tenemos que pensarlos
en el "contexto de la tecnología"? La respuesta es bastante simple: lo
que sea que la transparencia y la participación significaran ya no
importa. Ahora que estamos en la era de Todo 2.0, el significado de
estos términos será dictado por las posibilidades e inclinaciones de la
tecnología. ¿Y qué es la tecnología sino el _open source_ y la _web
2.0_?
Here, for example, is how O’Reilly tries to reengineer the meme of
transparency:
Obama articulaba en sus "Directivas para el Gobierno Abierto",
publicadas en su primer día como presidente. ¿Pero por qué tenemos que
pensarlos en el "contexto de la tecnología"? La respuesta es bastante
simple: lo que sea que la transparencia y la participación significaran
ya no importa. Ahora que estamos en la era de _Todo 2.0_, el
significado de estos términos será dictado por las posibilidades e
inclinaciones de la tecnología. ¿Y qué es la tecnología actual sino el
_open source_ y la _web 2.0_?
Por ejemplo, así es como O'Reilly intenta hacer reingeniería del meme de
la transparencia:
> The word “transparency” can lead us astray as we think about the
> opportunity for Government 2.0. Yes, it’s a good thing when government
> data is available so that journalists and watchdog groups like the
> Sunlight Foundation can disclose cost overruns in government projects
> or highlight the influence of lobbyists. But that’s just the
> beginning. The magic of open data is that the same openness that
> enables transparency also enables innovation, as developers build
> applications that reuse government data in unexpected ways.
> Fortunately, Vivek Kundra and others in the administration understand
> this distinction, and are providing data for both purposes.
> La palabra "transparencia" nos puede desviar mientras pensamos en la
> oportunidad que es el _gobierno 2.0_. Sí, es bueno que los datos del
> estado estén disponibles para que los periodistas y grupos activistas
> Estado estén disponibles para que los periodistas y grupos activistas
> como la _Sunlight Foundation_[^sunlight] puedan publicar los costos
> inflados de proyectos estatales o resaltar la influencia de los
> _lobbies_. Pero eso es sólo el comienzo. La magia de los datos
......@@ -1387,23 +1359,10 @@ la transparencia:
> comprenden esta distinción y están proveyendo datos para ambos
> propósitos.
[^sunlight]: Una fundación sobre datos abiertos (nota de la traducción).
[^sunlight]: Una fundación sobre datos abiertos.
Vivek Kundra is the former chief information officer of the U.S.
government who oversaw the launch of a portal called data.gov, which
required agencies to upload at least three “high-value” sets of their
own data. This data was made “open” in the same sense that open source
software is open—i.e., it was made available for anyone to see. But,
once again, O’Reilly is dabbling in meme-engineering: the data dumped on
data.gov, while potentially beneficial for innovation, does not
automatically “enable transparency.” O’Reilly deploys the highly
ambiguous concept of openness to confuse “transparency as
accountability” (what Obama called for in his directive) with
“transparency as innovation” (what O’Reilly himself wants).
Vivek Kundra es el anterior jefe de información del gobierno
estadounidense, que supervisó el lanzamiento de un portal llamado
Vivek Kundra es el ex-jefe de información del gobierno estadounidense,
que supervisó el lanzamiento de un portal llamado
[data.gov](http://data.gov), requiriendo a las agencias estatales
publicar al menos tres conjuntos de "alto valor" de los datos que
manejan. Estos datos fueron "abiertos" en el mismo sentido que el
......@@ -1413,61 +1372,32 @@ ingeniería memética: los datos lanzados a través de _data.gov_, mientras
que son potencialmente benéficos para la innovación, no "habilitan la
transparencia" automáticamente. O'Reilly emplea el concepto altamente
ambiguo de "apertura" para confundir "transparencia como
responsabilidad" (lo que Obama decía en su directiva) con "transparencia
como innovación" (lo que O'Reilly quiere).
How do we ensure accountability? Let’s forget about databases for a
moment and think about power. How do we make the government feel the
heat of public attention? Perhaps by forcing it to make targeted
disclosures of particularly sensitive data sets. Perhaps by
strengthening the FOIA laws, or at least making sure that government
agencies comply with existing provisions. Or perhaps by funding
intermediaries that can build narratives around data—much of the
released data is so complex that few amateurs have the processing power
and expertise to read and make sense of it in their basements. This
might be very useful for boosting accountability but useless for
boosting innovation; likewise, you can think of many data releases that
would be great for innovation and do nothing for accountability. The
language of “openness” does little to help us grasp key differences
between the two. In this context, openness leads to Neil Postman’s
“crazy talk,” resulting in the pollution of the values of one semantic
environment (accountability) with those of another (innovation).
responsabilidad" (lo que Obama decía en sus directivas) con
"transparencia como innovación" (lo que O'Reilly quiere).
¿Cómo aseguramos la responsabilidad? Olvidemos las bases de datos por
un momento y pensemos sobre el poder. ¿Cómo logramos que el gobierno
sienta el calor de la atención pública? Tal vez forzándolo a hacer
publicaciones puntuales de conjuntos de datos particularmente sensibles.
O tal vez fortaleciendo las leyes FOIA o al menos asegurándonos que las
agenciales estatales cumplen con las provisiones existentes. O tal vez
financiando intermediarios que puedan construir narrativas sobre esos
datos --ya que muchos de los datos publicados son tan complejos que
pocos amateurs tiene la capacidad de procesamiento y experticia para
leerlos y darles sentido. Esto podría ser muy útil para promover la
responsabilidad pero inútil para promover la innovación. Del mismo
modo, podemos imaginar muchas publicaciones de datos que serían geniales
para la innovación y no provocar nada en cuanto a responsabilidad. El
lenguaje de la "apertura" no nos ayuda mucho a captar las principales
diferencias entre ambos intereses. En este contexto, la apertura lleva
a la "charla loca" de Neil Postman, resultando en la polución de los
valores de un ambiente semántica (la responsabilidad) con los de otro
(la innovación).
O’Reilly doesn’t always coin new words. Sometimes he manipulates the
meanings of existing words. Cue his framing of “participation”:
O tal vez fortaleciendo las leyes de libertad de información o al menos
asegurándonos que las agenciales estatales cumplen con las provisiones
existentes. O tal vez financiando intermediarias que puedan construir
narrativas sobre esos datos --ya que muchos de los datos publicados son
tan complejos que pocas amateurs tienen la capacidad de procesamiento y
experticia para leerlos y darles sentido. Esto podría ser muy útil para
promover la responsabilidad pero inútil para promover la innovación.
Del mismo modo, podemos imaginar muchas publicaciones de datos que
serían geniales para la innovación y no provocar nada en cuanto a
responsabilidad. El lenguaje de la "apertura" no nos ayuda mucho a
captar las principales diferencias entre ambos intereses. En este
contexto, la apertura lleva a la _charla loca_ de Neil Postman,
resultando en la polución de los valores de un ambiente semántico (la
responsabilidad) con los de otro (la innovación).
O'Reilly no siempre acuña términos nuevos. A veces manipula los
significados de los existentes. Aquí su concepción de la
"participación":
> We can be misled by the notion of participation to think that it’s
> limited to having government decision-makers “get input” from
> citizens. This would be like thinking that enabling comments on a
> website is the beginning and end of social media! It’s a trap for
> outsiders to think that Government 2.0 is a way to use new technology
> to amplify the voices of citizens to influence those in power, and by
> insiders as a way to harness and channel those voices to advance their
> causes.
> La noción de la participación nos puede despistar hacia pensar que
> está limitada a que los que toman las decisiones "reciban las
> posiciones" de los ciudadanos. ¡Esto sería como pensar que permitir
......@@ -1478,19 +1408,8 @@ significados de los existentes. Aquí su concepción de la
> aquellos que tienen el poder y para los interiorizados como una forma
> de aprovechar y canalizar esas voces para promover sus causas.
It’s hard to make sense of this passage without understanding the exact
meaning of a term like “participation” in the glossary of All Things Web
2.0. According to O’Reilly, one of the key attributes of Web 2.0 sites
is that they are based on an “[architecture of
participation](http://oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/articles/architecture_of_participation.html)”;
it’s this architecture that allows “collective intelligence” to be
harnessed. Ranking your purchases on Amazon or reporting spammy emails
to Google are good examples of clever architectures of participation.
Once Amazon and Google start learning from millions of users, they
become “smarter” and more attractive to the original users.
Resulta difícil darle sentido a esta cita sin comprender el significado
exacto del término "participación" en el glosario de Todo 2.0. Según
exacto del término "participación" en el glosario del _Todo 2.0_. Según
O'Reilly, uno de los atributos clave de los sitios de la _web 2.0_ es
que están basados en una "[arquitectura de
participación](http://oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/articles/architecture_of_participation.html)",
......@@ -1500,33 +1419,14 @@ arquitecturas de participación astutas. Una vez que _Amazon_ y _Google_
empiezan a aprender de sus millones de usuarias, se vuelven "más
inteligentes" y más atractivas a las usuarias originales.
This is a very limited vision of participation. It amounts to no more
than a simple feedback session with whoever is running the system. You
are not participating in the design of that system, nor are you asked to
comment on its future. There is nothing “collective” about such
distributed intelligence; it’s just a bunch of individual users acting
on their own and never experiencing any sense of solidarity or group
belonging. Such “participation” has no political dimension; no power
changes hands.
Esta visión de lo que es la participación es muy limitada. No es más
que una simple sesión de _feedback_ con quien sea que está controlando
el sistema. No estamos participando en el diseño de dicho sistema, ni
nos preguntan opinión sobre su futuro. No hay nada "colectivo" en esa
inteligencia distribuida, solo somos un montón de usuarias individuales
actuando por nuestra cuenta y nunca experimentando un sentido de
solidaridad o pertenencia de grupo. Tal "participación" carece de
dimensión política, no hay poder cambiando de manos.
Occasionally, O’Reilly’s illustrations include activities that demand no
actual awareness of participation—e.g., a blog that puts up links to
other blogs ends up improving Google’s search index—which is, not
coincidentally perhaps, how we think of “participation” in the market
system when we go shopping. To imply that “participation” means the same
thing in the context of Web 2.0 as it does in politics is to do the very
opposite of what Korzybski and general semantics prescribe. Were he
really faithful to those principles, O’Reilly would be pointing out the
differences between the two—not blurring them.
que una simple sesión de retroalimentación con quien sea que está
controlando el sistema. No estamos participando en el diseño de dicho
sistema, ni nos preguntan opinión sobre su futuro. No hay nada
"colectivo" en esa inteligencia distribuida, solo somos un montón de
usuarias individuales actuando por nuestra cuenta y nunca experimentando
un sentido de solidaridad o pertenencia de grupo. Tal "participación"
carece de dimensión política, no hay poder cambiando de manos.
En ocasiones, las ilustraciones de O'Reilly incluyen actividades que no
demandan una verdadera conciencia de la participación --por ejemplo,
......@@ -1539,48 +1439,18 @@ prescriben Korzybski y la semántica general. Si fuera fiel a esos
principios, O'Reilly estaría demostrando las diferencias entre ambos, no
difuminándolas.
So what are we to make of O’Reilly’s exhortation that “it’s a trap for
outsiders to think that Government 2.0 is a way to use new technology to
amplify the voices of citizens to influence those in power”? We might
think that the hallmark of successful participatory reforms would be
enabling citizens to “influence those in power.” There’s a very explicit
depoliticization of participation at work here. O’Reilly wants to
redefine participation from something that arises from shared grievances
and aims at structural reforms to something that arises from individual
frustration with bureaucracies and usually ends with citizens using or
building apps to solve their own problems.
¿Entonces qué tenemos que hacer con su exhortación sobre "la trampa para
los ajenos pensar que el _gobierno 2.0_ es una forma de usar nuevas
tecnologías para amplificar las voces de los ciudadanos para influenciar
a aquellos que tienen el poder"? Podríamos pensar que el sello
distintivo de reformas participativas exitosas sería la capacidad de las
ciudadanas de "influenciar a aquellos que tienen el poder". Aquí hay una
despolitización muy explítica de la participación. O'Reilly quiere
ciudadanas de "influenciar a aquellos que tienen el poder". Aquí hay
una despolitización muy explítica de la participación. O'Reilly quiere
redefinir la participación desde algo que surge de reivindicaciones
compartidas y miras a reformas estructurales a algo que surge de
frustraciones individuales con las burocracias y que usualmente termina
con ciudadanas usando o construyendo _apps_ para resolver sus problemas.
> There is nothing “collective” about Amazon’s distributed intelligence;
> it’s just a bunch of individual users acting on their own.
As a result, once-lively debates about the content and meaning of
specific reforms and institutions are replaced by governments calling on
their citizens to help find spelling mistakes in patent applications or
use their phones to report potholes. If Participation 1.0 was about the
use of public reason to push for political reforms, with groups of
concerned citizens coalescing around some vague notion of the shared
public good, Participation 2.0 is about atomized individuals finding or
contributing the right data to solve some problem without creating any
disturbances in the system itself. (These citizens do come together at
“hackathons”—to help Silicon Valley liberate government data at no
cost—only to return to their bedrooms shortly thereafter.) Following the
open source model, citizens are invited to find bugs in the system, not
to ask whether the system’s goals are right to begin with. That politics
can aspire to something more ambitious than bug-management is not an
insight that occurs after politics has been reimagined through the prism
of open source software.
con ciudadanas usando o construyendo _apps_ para resolver sus propios
problemas.
Como resultado, los alguna vez acalorados debates sobre el contenido y
significado de reformas específicas e instituciones son reemplazados por
......@@ -1592,29 +1462,14 @@ ciudadanas comprometidas juntándose alrededor de vagas nociones del bien
público común, la _participación 2.0_ se trata de individuos atomizados
encontrando o contribuyendo los datos correctos para resolver algún
problema, sin alterar el sistema mismo. (Estas ciudadanas se juntan en
_hackatones_ para ayudar a Silicon Valley a liberar datos estatales sin
costo, volviendo a la inactividad después.) Siguiendo el modelo del
_open source_, las ciudadanas son invitadas a encontrar _bugs_ en el
sistema, no a preguntar si los objetivos del sistema son adecuados. Que
la política pueda inspirar a algo más ambicioso que la administración de
_bugs_ no es una visión que ocurra luego de que la política haya sido
reimaginada a través del prisma del software _open source_.
Protest is one activity that [O’Reilly hates
passionately](http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/04/change-we-need-diy-civic-scale.html).
“There’s a kind of passivity even to our activism: we think that all we
can do is to protest,” he writes. “Collective action has come to mean
collective complaint. Or at most, a collective effort to raise money.”
In contrast, he urges citizens to “apply the DIY spirit on a civic
scale.” To illustrate the DIY spirit in action, O’Reilly [likes to
invoke](http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/04/change-we-need-diy-civic-scale.html)
the example of a Hawaiian community that, following a period of
government inaction, raised \$4 million and repaired a local park
essential to its livelihood. For O’Reilly, the Hawaiian example reveals
the natural willingness of ordinary citizens to solve their own
problems. Governments should learn from Hawaii and offload more work
onto their citizens; this is the key insight behind O’Reilly’s
“government as a platform” meme.
_hackatones_ para ayudar a _Silicon Valley_ a liberar datos estatales
sin cobrar, volviendo a una cómoda inactividad después.) Siguiendo el
modelo del _open source_, las ciudadanas son invitadas a encontrar
_bugs_ en el sistema, no a preguntar si los objetivos del sistema son
adecuados. Que la política pueda inspirar a algo más ambicioso que la
administración de _bugs_ no es una visión que ocurra luego de que la
política haya sido reimaginada a través del prisma del software _open
source_.
La protesta es una actividad que O'Reilly [odia con
pasión](http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/04/change-we-need-diy-civic-scale.html).
......@@ -1633,48 +1488,26 @@ sus propios problemas. Los estados deberían aprender de Hawaii y
descargar más trabajo en sus ciudadanas. Esta es la visión clave detrás
del meme "Estado como plataforma".
[^diy]: _Do It Yourself_ --hazlo tú misma-- es un principio de acción
directa punk (nota de la traducción).
This platform meme was, of course, inspired by Silicon Valley. Instead
of continuing to build its own apps, Apple built an App Store, getting
third-party developers to do all the heavy lifting. This is the model
that governments must emulate. In fact, notes O’Reilly, they once did:
in the 1950s, the U.S. government built a system of highways that
allowed the private sector to build many more settlements around them,
while in the 1980s the Reagan administration started opening up the GPS
system, which gave us amazing road directions and Foursquare (where
O’Reilly is an investor).
Por supuesto que este meme de las plataformas fue inspirado por _Silicon
Valley_. En lugar de construir sus propias _apps_, _Apple_ construyó la
_Apple Store_, logrando que desarrolladores ajenos a la empresa cargaran
con el peso. Este es el modelo que el estado debe emular. De hecho,
nota O'Reilly, alguna vez lo hicieron: en los '50, el estado
_Apple Store_, logrando que desarrolladoras ajenas a la empresa cargaran
con el peso. Este es el modelo que el Estado debe emular. De hecho,
nota O'Reilly, alguna vez lo hicieron: en los '50, el Estado
estadounidense construyó un sistema de autopistas que permitieron al
sector privado construir muchos más asentamientos a su alrededor,
mientras que en los '80 el gobierno de Reagan comenzó por abrir el
sistema de GPS, lo que nos dio las maravillosas direcciones de tránsito
sistema de GPS, lo que nos dió las maravillosas direcciones de tránsito
y _Foursquare_ (de la que O'Reilly es inversor).
O’Reilly’s prescriptions, as is often the case, do contain a grain of
truth, but he nearly always exaggerates their benefits while obfuscating
their costs. One of the main reasons why governments choose not to
offload certain services to the private sector is not because they think
they can do a better job at innovation or efficiency but because other
considerations—like fairness and equity of access—come into play. “If
Head Start were a start-up it would be out of business. It doesn’t
work,” remarked O’Reilly in a [recent
interview](http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/interviews-profiles).
Well, exactly: that’s why Head Start is not a start-up.
Sus prescripciones a menudo contienen una pizca de verdad, pero casi
siempre exagera los beneficioes mientras ofusca los costos. Una de las
siempre exagera los beneficios mientras ofusca los costos. Una de las
razones por las que los estados no eligen descargar ciertos servicios al
sector privado no se deben a que piensen que pueden hacer un mejor
trabajo en cuando a innovación o eficiencia sino porque existen otras
consideraciones --como justifica y acceso igualitario-- que están en
consideraciones --como justicia y acceso igualitario-- que están en
juego. "Si _Head Start_ fuera una _startup_ iría a la quiebra. No
funciona", remarcaba en una [entrevista
reciente](http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/interviews-profiles).
......@@ -1683,15 +1516,7 @@ Exactamente, por eso _Head Start_[^head_start] no lo es.
[^head_start]: _Head Start_ es un programa estatal que desde 1965 provee
ayuda escolar a niñas de bajos recursos (nota de la traducción).
The real question is not whether developers should be able to submit
apps to the App Store, but whether citizens should be paying for the
apps or counting on the government to provide these services. To push
for the platform metaphor as the primary way of thinking about the
distribution of responsibilities between the private and the public
sectors is to push for the economic-innovative dimension of Gov 2.0—and
ensure that the private sector always emerges victorious.
La pregunta real no es si los desarrolladores deberían poder enviar
La pregunta real no es si las desarrolladoras deberían poder enviar
_apps_ a la _App Store_, sino si las ciudadanas deberían pagar por ellas
o esperar que el Estado provea esos servicios. Promover la metáfora de
la plataforma como la forma principal de pensar sobre la distribución de
......@@ -1699,91 +1524,41 @@ responsabilidades entre los sectores público y privado es promover la
dimensión económica-innovativa del _gobierno 2.0_ --y asegurarse que el
sector privado siempre emerja victorioso.
O’Reilly defines “government as a platform” as “the notion that the best
way to shrink the size of government is to introduce the idea that
government should provide fewer citizen-facing services, but should
instead consciously provide infrastructure only, with APIs and standards
that let the private sector deliver citizen facing services.” [He
believes
that](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html)
“the idea of government as a platform applies to every aspect of the
government’s role in society”—city affairs, health care, financial
services regulation, police, fire, and garbage collection. “\[Government
as a platform\] is the right way to frame the question of Government
2.0.”
O'Reilly define el "Estado como plataforma" como "la noción de que la
O'Reilly define el _Estado como plataforma_ como "la noción de que la
mejor manera de achicar el Estado es introduciendo la idea de que debe
proveer menos servicios a los ciudadanos y en su lugar proveer solo la
infraestructura, con APIs[^api] y estándares que permitan al sector
privado proveer esos mismos servicios." [Cree
que](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html)
"la idea del Estado como plataforma aplica a todo aspecto del rol del
"la idea del _Estado como plataforma_ aplica a todo aspecto del rol del
Estado en la sociedad" --gestión de la ciudad, salud, regulación de
servicios financieros, policía, bomberos y recolección de basura. "\[El
Estado como plataforma\] es la forma correcta de enmarcar la pregunta
del _gobierno 2.0_.
[^api]: Una _API_ en este contexto es una forma de obtener datos de una
plataforma desde otra (nota de la traducción).
One person who is busy turning the “government as a platform” meme into
reality is David Cameron in the U.K. Cameron’s “[Big
Society](http://www.number10.gov.uk/news/big-society-speech/)” idea is
based on three main tenets: decentralization of power from London to
local governments, making information about the public sector more
transparent to citizens, and paying providers of public services based
on the quality of their service, which, ideally, would be measured and
published online, thanks to feedback provided by the public. The idea
here is that the government will serve as a coordinator of sorts,
allowing people to come together—perhaps even giving them seed funding
to kick-start alternatives to inefficient public services.
Una persona que está muy ocupada en volver realidad el meme del "Estado
como plataforma" es David Cameron en el Reino Unido. La idea de _[Big
Society](http://www.number10.gov.uk/news/big-society-speech/)_ de
Cameron está basada en tres principios: decentralización del poder desde
plataforma desde otra, usando un protocolo público (nota de la
traducción).
Una persona que está muy ocupada en volver realidad el meme del _Estado
como plataforma_ es David Cameron en el Reino Unido. La idea de [_Big
Society_](http://www.number10.gov.uk/news/big-society-speech/) de
Cameron está basada en tres principios: decentralizar el poder desde
Londres a los gobiernos locales, transparentar la información del sector
público a las ciudadanas y pagar a los proveedores de servicios públicos
de acuerdo a la calidad del servicio, que idealmente sería medido y
publicado en línea, gracias al _feedback_ provisto por el público. La
idea aquí es que el Estado funcionaría como una especie de coordinador,
permitiendo a la gente a unirse --tal vez proveyendo el capital semilla
para arrancar alternativas a servicios públicos ineficientes.
> Once-lively debates about reform are replaced by governments calling
> on their citizens to use their phones to report potholes.
Cameron’s motivation is clear: the government simply has no money to pay
for services that were previously provided by public institutions, and
besides, shrinking the government is something his party has been
meaning to do anyway. Cameron immediately grasped the strategic
opportunities offered by the ambiguity of a term like “open government”
and embraced it wholeheartedly—in its most apolitical, economic version,
of course. At the same time that he celebrated the ability of “[armchair
auditors](http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1345777/David-Cameron-Armchair-auditors-leave-councils-hide.html)
to pore through government databases, he also criticized freedom of
information laws, alleging that FOI requests are “[furring up the
arteries of
government](http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9149322/What-price-freedom-of-information.html)
and even threatening to start charging for them. Francis Maude, the Tory
politician who Cameron put in charge of liberating government data, is
[on the record
stating](http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/845) that
open government is “what modern deregulation looks like” and that he’d
“like to make FOI redundant.” In 2011, Cameron’s government released a
white paper on “[Open Public
Services](http://www.openpublicservices.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/)” that
uses the word “open” in a peculiar way: it argues that, save for
national security and the judiciary, all public services must become
open to competition from the market.
publicado en línea, gracias a la retroalimentación provista por el
público. La idea aquí es que el Estado funcionaría como una especie de
coordinador, permitiendo a la gente unirse --tal vez proveyendo el
capital semilla para arrancar alternativas a servicios públicos
ineficientes.
La motivación de Cameron es clara: el Estado no tiene dinero para pagar
por servicios que anteriormente eran provistos por instituciones
públicas y de todas maneras el achicamiento estatal siempre ha sido un
objetivo de su partido. Cameron captó inmediatamente las oportunidades
estratégicas ofrecidas por la ambigüedad de términos como "gobierno
abierto" y las abrazó de todo corazón --en su versión más apolítica y
estratégicas ofrecidas por la ambigüedad de términos como _gobierno
abierto_ y las abrazó de todo corazón --en su versión más apolítica y
económica, por supuesto. Al mismo tiempo que celebraba la habilidad de
los "[auditores de
sillón](http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1345777/David-Cameron-Armchair-auditors-leave-councils-hide.html)"
......@@ -1795,7 +1570,7 @@ e incluso amenazó con cambiarlas. Francis Maude, el político
conservador al que Cameron puso a cargo de liberar datos estatales,
[dijo
públicamente](http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/845) que
el gobierno abierto es "la desregulación moderna" y que le gustaría
el _gobierno abierto_ es "la desregulación moderna" y que le gustaría
"volver redundante la libertad de información". En el 2011, el gobierno
de Cameron publicó un libro blanco sobre "[Servicios Públicos
Abiertos](http://www.openpublicservices.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/)" que
......@@ -1803,28 +1578,12 @@ utiliza el término "abierto" de una forma muy peculiar: argumenta que,
salvo la seguridad nacional y la justicia, todos los servicios públicos
deben abrirse a la competencia de mercado.
Here’s just one example of how a government that is nominally promoting
Tim O’Reilly’s progressive agenda of Gov 2.0 and “government as a
platform” is rolling back the welfare state and increasing government
secrecy—all in the name of “openness.” The reason why Cameron has
managed to get away with so much crazy talk is simple: the positive spin
attached to “openness” allows his party to hide the ugly nature of its
reforms. O’Reilly, who had [otherwise
praised](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIlxdpfu71o) the Government
Digital Service, the unit responsible for the digitization of the
British government, is aware that the “Big Society” might reveal the
structural limitations of his quest for “openness.” Thus, he publicly
[distanced himself from
Cameron](http://whimsley.typepad.com/whimsley/2012/05/open-data-movement-redux-tribes-and-contradictions.html),
complaining of “the shabby abdication of responsibility of Cameron’s Big
Society.”
Este es solo un ejemplo de cómo un gobierno que nominalmente promueve la
agenda progresista de Tim O'Reilly sobre el _gobierno 2.0_ y el "Estado
como plataforma" en realidad está haciendo retroceder el Estado de
agenda progresista de Tim O'Reilly sobre el _gobierno 2.0_ y el _Estado
como plataforma_ en realidad está haciendo retroceder el Estado de
bienestar e incrementando el secreto de Estado --todo en el nombre de la
"apertura". La razón por la que Cameron ha logrado salir impune de tal
charla loca es simple: el giro positivo asociado a la "apertura" le
_charla loca_ es simple: el giro positivo asociado a la "apertura" le
permite a su partido esconder la fea naturaleza de sus reformas.
O'Reilly, que [de otra forma
festejaba](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIlxdpfu71o) el Servicio
......@@ -1836,63 +1595,27 @@ Cameron](http://whimsley.typepad.com/whimsley/2012/05/open-data-movement-redux-t
quejándose de la "lamentable abdicación de responsabilidad que es la
_Big Society_ de Cameron".
But is this the same O’Reilly who [once claimed
that](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html)
the goal of his proposed reforms is to “design programs and supporting
infrastructure that enable ‘we the people’ to do most of the work”? His
rejection of Cameron is pure PR, as they largely share the same
agenda—not an easy thing to notice, as O’Reilly constantly alternates
between two visions of open government. O’Reilly the good cop claims
that he wants the government to release its data to promote more
innovation by the private sector, while O’Reilly the bad cop wants to
use that newly liberated data to shrink the government. “There is no
Schumpeterian ‘creative destruction’ to bring unneeded government
programs to an end,” [he lamented in
2010](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html).
“Government 2.0 will require deep thinking about how to end programs
that no longer work, and how to use the platform power of the government
not to extend government’s reach, but instead, how to use it to better
enable its citizenry and its economy.” [Speaking to British civil
servants](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIlxdpfu71o), O’Reilly
positions open government as the right thing to do in times of
austerity, not just as an effective way to promote innovation.
¿Pero no es el mismo O'Reilly que [una vez
proclamó](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html)
que el objetivo de las reformas que propone es "diseñar programas e
infraestructura de apoyo que permita que 'nosotros el pueblo' hagamos la
mayor parte del trabajo"? Su rechazo a Cameron fueron puras relaciones
públicas, porque comparten la misma agenda --algo difícil de notar, ya
que O'Reilly alterna constantemente entre dos visiones del gobierno
abierto. O'Reilly el policía bueno proclama que quiere que el Estado
que O'Reilly alterna constantemente entre dos visiones del _gobierno
abierto_. O'Reilly el policía bueno proclama que quiere que el Estado
publique sus datos para promover la innovación en el sector público,
mientras que O'Reilly el policía malo quiere usar los datos liberados
para reducir el Estado. "No hay 'creación destructiva' schumpeteriana
que elimine los programas estatales innecesarios", [lamentaba en el
2010](http://ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596804350/defining_government_2_0_lessons_learned_.html).
"El _gobierno 2.0_ requiere una meditación profunda sobre cómo
eliminar aquellos programas que ya no funcionan y sobre cómo usar
el poder de la plataforma estatal no para extender el alcance del
Estado, sino para mejorar la ciudadanía y su economía."
[Hablándole a funcionarios públicos
ingleses](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIlxdpfu71o), O'Reilly propone
que el _gobierno abierto_ es la manera correcta de hacer las cosas en
tiempos de austeridad, no solo como una forma efectiva de promover la
innovación.
After *The New Yorker* ran a [long, critical
article](http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/10/25/101025fa_fact_collins)
on the Big Society in 2010, Jennifer Pahlka—O’Reilly’s key ally, who
runs an NGO called Code for America—quickly [moved to
dismiss](http://codeforamerica.org/2010/10/29/the-challenges-of-do-it-ourselves-dio-government/)
any parallels between Cameron and O’Reilly. “The beauty of the
government as a platform model is that it doesn’t assume civic
participation, it encourages it subtly by aligning with existing
motivations in its citizens, so that anyone—ranging from the fixers in
Hawaii to the cynics in Britain—would be willing to get involved,” she
noted in a blog post. “We’d better be careful we don’t send the wrong
message, and that when we’re building tools for citizen engagement, we
do it in the way that taps existing motivations.”
"El _gobierno 2.0_ requiere una meditación profunda sobre cómo eliminar
aquellos programas que ya no funcionan y sobre cómo usar el poder de la
plataforma estatal no para extender el alcance del Estado, sino para
mejorar la ciudadanía y su economía." [Hablándole a funcionarios
públicos ingleses](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIlxdpfu71o), O'Reilly
propone que el _gobierno abierto_ es la manera correcta de hacer las
cosas en tiempos de austeridad, no solo como una forma efectiva de
promover la innovación.
Luego de que _The New Yorker_ publicara un [artículo largo y
crítico](http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/10/25/101025fa_fact_collins)
......@@ -1901,8 +1624,8 @@ O'Reilly desde su posición como dirigente de la ONG _Code for America_--
rápidamente [llamó a
rechazar](http://codeforamerica.org/2010/10/29/the-challenges-of-do-it-ourselves-dio-government/)
cualquier paralelismo entre Cameron y O'Reilly. "La belleza del modelo
del Estado como plataforma es que no asume la participación cívica, sino
que la alienta sutilmente al alinearse con las motivaciones
del _Estado como plataforma_ es que no asume la participación cívica,
sino que la alienta sutilmente al alinearse con las motivaciones
pre-existentes de sus ciudadanos, para que cualquiera --desde los
arregladores en Hawaii a los cínicos en Gran Bretaña-- tengan la
disposición a involucrarse", decía en su blog. "Tengamos cuidado de no
......@@ -1910,40 +1633,16 @@ enviar el mensaje incorrecto y que cuando construyamos herramientas para
el involucramiento cívico, lo hagamos de forma que aproveche
motivaciones pre-existentes."
But what kinds of “existing motivations” are there to be tapped?
O’Reilly writes that, in [his ideal
future](http://codeforamerica.org/2010/10/29/the-challenges-of-do-it-ourselves-dio-government/#comment-92778371),
governments will be “making smart design decisions, which harness the
self-interest of society and citizens to achieve positive results.”
That, in fact, is how his favorite technology platforms work: users tell
Google that some of their incoming email is spam in order to improve